Elbow Conditions

Learn more about the shoulder injuries and conditions we treat using physiotherapy:

Distal Bicep Rupture

What is a distal bicep rupture?

A distal bicep rupture, also known as a distal biceps tendon rupture, is a relatively uncommon injury that occurs when the tendon connecting the biceps muscle to the radius bone in the forearm tears or ruptures near the elbow joint. The biceps muscle is responsible for flexing the elbow and rotating the forearm, and it has two tendons (proximal and distal) that attach it to the bone.

What causes a distal bicep rupture?

Distal bicep ruptures are typically the result of sudden, forceful actions or excessive stress placed on the biceps tendon. Common causes and risk factors include:

  1. Lifting Heavy Objects: Attempting to lift an object that is too heavy or using improper lifting technique can lead to a distal bicep rupture.
  2. Direct Trauma: A direct blow to the front of the elbow can cause the biceps tendon to tear.
  3. Overuse and Age: Chronic overuse of the biceps tendon or age-related degeneration can weaken the tendon and increase the risk of rupture.
  4. Anabolic Steroid Use: The use of anabolic steroids can potentially weaken tendons and increase the risk of ruptures.
  5. Sudden Forceful Movements: Activities that require sudden, forceful extension of the elbow, such as lifting weights, throwing, or resisting a sudden fall, can strain the biceps tendon.

What are the signs and symptoms of a distal bicep rupture?

Symptoms of a distal bicep rupture may include:

  • Sudden and severe pain at the front of the elbow.
  • A popping or snapping sensation at the time of injury.
  • Bruising and swelling around the elbow.
  • Weakness in flexing the elbow and rotating the forearm.
  • A noticeable bulge or deformity near the elbow caused by the retracted biceps muscle.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for a distal bicep rupture?

Treatment for a distal bicep rupture may involve both non-surgical and surgical approaches, depending on the severity of the injury and the patient’s activity level. The options include:

  1. Non-Surgical Treatment: In some cases, especially for older individuals or those with low physical demands, non-surgical treatment may be considered. This involves rest, immobilization with a splint or brace, and physical therapy to maintain range of motion and muscle strength.
  2. Surgical Repair: Surgical repair is often recommended for younger, active individuals and those with a complete rupture. The surgical procedure involves reattaching the torn tendon to the radius bone using various fixation methods, such as sutures, anchors, or screws. After surgery, a structured rehabilitation program is essential to regain strength and function.

Physiotherapy is a crucial component of the rehabilitation process after a distal bicep rupture, especially for individuals who undergo surgical repair to reattach the torn tendon to the radius bone.

The goal of physiotherapy is to help patients regain strength, mobility, and function in the affected arm while minimizing complications and preventing re-injury.

Here’s an overview of the physiotherapy approach for a distal bicep rupture:

Post-Operative Phase:

  1. Immobilization and Protection: After surgical repair, the arm may be immobilized in a splint or brace to protect the healing tendon. It’s essential to adhere to the prescribed immobilization period.
  2. Pain Management: The physiotherapist may use modalities such as ice, electrical stimulation, or compression to manage post-operative pain and reduce swelling.
  3. Early Range of Motion: The physiotherapist will guide the patient through gentle range of motion exercises as early as possible to prevent stiffness. These exercises often start with passive movements, and the patient should avoid active use of the injured arm during this phase.

Intermediate Phase:

  1. Strengthening Exercises: Once the surgical site is adequately healed, the focus shifts to strengthening exercises. These exercises target the biceps and other muscles surrounding the elbow joint. They may include resistance bands, free weights, and isometric exercises.
  2. Functional Movements: The physiotherapist will introduce exercises that mimic daily activities and specific sports movements to help the patient regain the ability to perform these tasks safely and effectively.

Late Phase:

  1. Proprioception and Neuromuscular Training: These exercises aim to improve joint stability, coordination, and functional movement patterns. They may include balancing drills and functional activities.
  2. Stretching Exercises: Stretching exercises are used to improve flexibility in the elbow and surrounding muscles. Stretches may target the biceps, triceps, and forearm muscles.
  3. Gradual Return to Activities: The physiotherapist will work with the patient to create a gradual return-to-activity plan, which may include resuming specific sports or activities when strength and stability have been sufficiently restored.

Throughout the rehabilitation process, the physiotherapist plays a crucial role in monitoring the patient’s progress, providing guidance, and adjusting the treatment plan as needed. The patient’s commitment to a consistent home exercise program is also essential for successful recovery.

Rehabilitation timelines can vary depending on the severity of the rupture, the surgical technique used, and the patient’s individual progress. It’s important to follow the guidance of your healthcare provider and physiotherapist to achieve the best possible outcome and minimize the risk of re-injury.

Elbow Dislocation

What is an elbow dislocation?

An elbow dislocation is a traumatic injury in which the bones of the forearm (the radius and ulna) become displaced from their normal positions in relation to the upper arm bone (the humerus). This results in the disruption of the joint at the elbow, causing severe pain and loss of function. 

What causes an elbow dislocation?

Elbow dislocations are often the result of a significant force applied to the joint, such as a fall, a direct blow, or a sports-related injury.

There are two primary types of elbow dislocations:

  1. Complete Elbow Dislocation: In a complete dislocation, the bones of the forearm are completely displaced from the humerus, and the joint surfaces are no longer in contact. This is a more severe form of dislocation.
  2. Partial Elbow Dislocation (Subluxation): In a partial dislocation, one or both of the forearm bones partially dislocate from the humerus but do not fully separate from the joint. This is often referred to as a subluxation and is considered less severe than a complete dislocation.

What are the signs and symptoms of an elbow dislocation?

Elbow dislocations can result in various symptoms, which may include:

  • Severe pain and swelling at the elbow joint.
  • Visible deformity, as the joint may appear misaligned.
  • Limited range of motion in the elbow.
  • Numbness or tingling in the forearm or hand due to potential nerve compression.
  • Weakness in the affected arm.
  • Inability to use the arm or hand properly.

Elbow dislocations are considered medical emergencies and require immediate attention. They are typically diagnosed through physical examination and imaging studies such as X-rays or, in some cases, CT scans.

What is the emergency treatment for elbow dislocation?

Treatment for elbow dislocation involves:

  1. Reduction: This is the process of returning the dislocated bones to their normal positions. A healthcare provider, such as an orthopedic specialist, usually performs this procedure. It may be done with or without anesthesia, depending on the patient’s condition and pain level.
  2. Immobilization: After reduction, the elbow is often immobilized with a splint or cast to allow the surrounding structures to heal properly. The duration of immobilization varies depending on the severity of the dislocation and the specific treatment plan.

In some severe cases, associated injuries to ligaments, tendons, or nerves may require additional treatment, such as surgery. It’s important to follow the guidance of a healthcare provider for the most appropriate management of an elbow dislocation to ensure the best possible recovery and minimize the risk of future complications.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for elbow dislocation?

Physiotherapy is an important component of the rehabilitation process following an elbow dislocation. It helps restore strength, mobility, and function to the affected elbow and prevents complications like stiffness or instability. The specific physiotherapy program may vary based on the severity of the dislocation and any associated injuries, but here are some general principles:

  1. Post-Reduction Immobilization: Initially, the dislocated elbow is often immobilized in a splint or cast to protect the healing structures and prevent further injury. The duration of immobilization is determined by the healthcare provider and is typically several weeks.
  2. Early Range of Motion Exercises: After the initial immobilization period, your physiotherapist will guide you through gentle range of motion exercises to restore flexibility and prevent stiffness. These exercises often begin with passive movements to minimize stress on the healing joint.
  3. Strengthening Exercises: Once the range of motion is improved, the focus shifts to strengthening the muscles around the elbow. This includes exercises for the biceps, triceps, forearm muscles, and other muscles that support the elbow joint. Resistance bands, free weights, or isometric exercises may be used.
  4. Neuromuscular Training: Proprioception and neuromuscular training exercises can help improve joint stability and coordination. These exercises may include balancing drills and functional movements to regain control of the affected arm.
  5. Scar Tissue Management: If you have scars from surgical incisions or wound healing, your physiotherapist may use scar tissue massage techniques to improve the flexibility and appearance of the scars.
  6. Functional Exercises: Your physiotherapist will gradually introduce functional exercises that mimic daily activities or sports-specific movements, depending on your goals. This helps you regain the ability to perform these tasks safely and effectively.
  7. Pain Management: Modalities like ice, heat, and electrical stimulation may be used to manage pain and reduce inflammation.
  8. Patient Education: Your physiotherapist will educate you on proper joint protection techniques and ergonomic considerations to prevent future injuries.
  9. Home Exercise Program: A customized home exercise program will be provided for you to perform regularly between therapy sessions. Consistency with these exercises is essential for recovery.
  10. Gradual Return to Activities: If your dislocation was related to specific sports or activities, your physiotherapist will work with you to create a gradual return-to-activity plan. This plan ensures you have the necessary strength, stability, and range of motion to safely resume these activities.

It’s important to work closely with your physiotherapist and adhere to their recommendations to achieve the best possible recovery following an elbow dislocation.

The specific exercises and treatment plan will be tailored to your individual needs and the severity of your dislocation. The goal of physiotherapy is to restore function, minimize pain, and help you regain the use of your affected arm.

Elbow Sprain

What is an elbow sprain?

An elbow sprain, also known as a ligamentous injury of the elbow, occurs when one or more of the ligaments that support and stabilize the elbow joint are stretched or torn. Ligaments are tough, fibrous bands of connective tissue that connect bone to bone and help maintain the stability of joints.

In the case of an elbow sprain, these ligaments may be partially or completely injured due to trauma or overstretching.

Elbow sprains can range from mild (Grade I) to severe (Grade III), depending on the extent of ligament damage.

The elbow joint is made up of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), the radius, and the ulna (the two bones of the forearm). The ligaments in the elbow help keep these bones in proper alignment. 

The ulnar collateral ligament is on the inside of the elbow and the radial collateral ligament is on the outside.

What causes and elbow sprain?

Common causes of elbow sprains include:

  1. Falls: Landing on an outstretched arm can cause excessive stress on the elbow ligaments and lead to a sprain.
  2. Hyperextension: Forcing the elbow into an unnatural, extended position, such as during a sudden pull or tug, can result in a sprain.
  3. Sports Injuries: Sports that involve overhead throwing motions, contact, or sudden changes in direction can increase the risk of elbow sprains.
  4. Repetitive Stress: Activities that involve repetitive elbow movements or overuse, such as weightlifting or repetitive gripping, can contribute to ligament injuries over time.

What are the signs and symptoms of an elbow sprain?

The symptoms of an elbow sprain may include:

  • Pain, tenderness, and swelling at the elbow joint.
  • Reduced range of motion.
  • Instability or a feeling of the elbow “giving way.”
  • Bruising and discoloration.
  • In some cases, a popping or tearing sensation at the time of injury.

The severity of an elbow sprain is determined by the extent of ligament damage:

  • Grade I (Mild): Ligaments are stretched but not torn. There may be minimal pain and swelling.
  • Grade II (Moderate): Ligaments are partially torn, resulting in moderate pain, swelling, and some loss of function.
  • Grade III (Severe): Ligaments are completely torn, leading to severe pain, significant swelling, and marked loss of function.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for an elbow sprain?

Physiotherapy plays a crucial role in the rehabilitation of an elbow sprain. The goal of physiotherapy is to restore the strength, flexibility, and stability of the elbow joint, alleviate pain, and prevent future injuries.

The specific physiotherapy program will depend on the grade and severity of the sprain, but here are some general principles:

  1. Initial Assessment: The physiotherapy process typically begins with a thorough assessment of your condition to evaluate the extent of the elbow sprain and determine any contributing factors.
  2. Pain Management: In the early stages, the focus may be on pain management and reducing inflammation. Modalities like ice or cold therapy, ultrasound, and potentially the use of anti-inflammatory medications, as directed by a healthcare provider, can be used.
  3. Immobilization: In some cases, the elbow may need to be immobilized with a splint or brace to protect the injured ligaments and allow for proper healing.
  4. Range of Motion Exercises: Once the acute phase has passed, the physiotherapist will guide you through gentle range of motion exercises to restore flexibility and prevent stiffness. These exercises often begin with passive movements to minimize stress on the healing ligaments.
  5. Strengthening Exercises: Strengthening the muscles around the elbow is essential to provide support and stability. Exercises may target the forearm muscles, biceps, triceps, and other muscles that support the joint. Resistance bands, free weights, or isometric exercises may be used.
  6. Neuromuscular Training: Proprioception and neuromuscular training exercises can help improve joint stability and coordination. These exercises may include balancing drills and functional movements.
  7. Stretching Exercises: Stretching exercises aim to improve flexibility in the elbow and surrounding muscles. Stretching may focus on the forearm, triceps, and biceps muscles.
  8. Functional Exercises: As you progress, functional exercises that mimic daily activities or specific sports movements are introduced. This helps you regain the ability to perform these tasks safely and effectively.
  9. Posture and Ergonomics: Education on maintaining proper posture and body mechanics is important to prevent future injuries. The physiotherapist may provide guidance on workstation ergonomics and daily life adjustments.
  10. Home Exercise Program: Your physiotherapist will design a customized home exercise program for you to perform regularly between therapy sessions. Consistency with these exercises is crucial for recovery.
  11. Gradual Return to Activities: If your elbow sprain is related to specific sports or activities, your physiotherapist will work with you to create a gradual return-to-activity plan. This ensures you have the necessary strength, stability, and range of motion to safely resume these activities.

It’s important to work closely with your physiotherapist, adhere to their recommendations, and progress at a pace that’s appropriate for your individual situation.

The specific exercises and treatment plan will be tailored to your needs and the severity of your elbow sprain. The goal of physiotherapy is to restore function, minimize pain, and help you regain the use of your affected arm while preventing further injuries.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments. To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Golfer’s Elbow

What is Golfer’s Elbow?

Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is a condition that causes pain and inflammation in the tendons that attach to the bony bump on the inside of the elbow. Despite its name, golfer’s elbow can affect anyone who repeatedly uses their forearm muscles, not just golfers.

What causes Golfer’s Elbow?

The primary cause of golfer’s elbow is repetitive or forceful wrist and finger movements. Activities such as golfing, playing tennis, throwing sports, weightlifting, and repetitive hand or wrist motions can contribute to the development of this condition. The repeated stress on the tendons can lead to small tears and subsequent inflammation.

What are the signs and symptoms of Golfer’s Elbow?

Symptoms of golfer’s elbow usually develop gradually and may include:

  1. Pain or tenderness on the inside of the elbow.
  2. Stiffness and weakness in the forearm.
  3. Pain when gripping or squeezing objects.
  4. Pain that worsens with certain activities, such as swinging a golf club or racket.
  5. Difficulty fully extending or flexing the arm.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for Golfer’s Elbow?

To manage golfer’s elbow, a combination of conservative treatments is often recommended, including:

  1. Manual therapy: Joint mobilizations to the elbow joint and in some cases the neck and upper back will help to restore proper joint mechanics and reduce stiffness.
  2. Exercise: A physiotherapist can guide you through exercises to stretch and strengthen the affected muscles and tendons.
  3. Rest: Avoiding activities that worsen the symptoms and giving the affected area time to heal.
  4. Ice therapy: Applying ice packs to the affected area for 15-20 minutes several times a day can help reduce pain and inflammation.
  5. Compression: Using an elbow brace or wrap can provide support and help relieve symptoms.
  6. Medications: Over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, can help reduce pain and swelling.
  7. Modification of activities: Adjusting your technique or using ergonomic tools or equipment can help reduce stress on the affected tendons.
  8. Steroid injections: In some cases, corticosteroid injections may be recommended to reduce inflammation and relieve pain.

If you suspect you have golfer’s elbow or are experiencing persistent elbow pain, it is best to consult with physiotherapist for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan tailored to your specific condition. To book an appointment with one of our experienced FCAMT physiotherapists, click here!

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Lateral Epicondylitis

What is lateral epicondylitis?

Lateral epicondylitis, commonly known as “tennis elbow,” is a painful condition that affects the tendons and muscles on the outer part of the elbow. It is called tennis elbow because it is often associated with activities that involve repetitive wrist and arm motions, such as those used in playing tennis.

However, you don’t have to be a tennis player to develop this condition; it can occur in people who engage in various types of repetitive gripping or twisting movements.

Lateral epicondylitis is characterized by inflammation or microtears in the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle, which is the bony bump on the outer part of the elbow. These tendons are responsible for attaching the forearm muscles to the upper arm bone (humerus) and are involved in wrist extension.

What causes lateral epicondylitis?

Common causes and risk factors for lateral epicondylitis include:

  1. Repetitive activities: Activities that involve repeated gripping, twisting, or lifting, such as playing tennis, using hand tools, typing, or painting, can strain the tendons and lead to the development of tennis elbow.
  2. Overuse or muscle imbalances: Overusing the forearm muscles without adequate rest or having imbalances between the forearm muscles can increase the risk of injury.

What are the signs and symptoms of lateral epicondylitis?

Symptoms of lateral epicondylitis may include:

  1. Pain on the outer part of the elbow, especially during gripping or lifting activities.
  2. Weakness in the affected arm and a decrease in grip strength.
  3. Stiffness in the elbow.
  4. Pain that may radiate down the forearm.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for lateral epicondylitis?

Physiotherapy can be an essential part of the treatment plan for lateral epicondylitis, commonly known as tennis elbow. The primary goal of physiotherapy for tennis elbow is to reduce pain, promote healing, and restore strength and function to the affected arm. Here are some common components of physiotherapy for lateral epicondylitis:

  1. Manual therapy: Physiotherapists may use hands-on techniques such as soft tissue massage, joint mobilization, and myofascial release to reduce pain and muscle tension.
  2. Education: Understanding the condition and its causes is crucial. Your physiotherapist can provide information on proper body mechanics, activities to avoid, and lifestyle modifications.
  3. Rest and activity modification: Reducing or modifying activities that exacerbate symptoms is often the first step in managing tennis elbow.
  4. Range of motion exercises: Gentle, controlled movements to improve elbow and wrist mobility while minimizing stress on the affected tendons.
  5. Strengthening exercises: Targeted exercises to strengthen the forearm muscles, with a focus on the wrist extensors. These exercises are essential for improving the strength and stability of the affected arm.
  6. Stretching exercises: Gentle stretching of the forearm and wrist muscles can help reduce muscle tension and improve flexibility.
  7. Ultrasound: May be used to promote healing and reduce pain in some cases.
  8. Eccentric exercises: Eccentric strengthening exercises, which involve the lengthening of the muscle while contracting, are often used to target the specific tendons affected by tennis elbow.
  9. Joint mobilization: Mobilization techniques for the elbow and wrist joints can help improve joint range of motion and reduce pain.
  10. Posture correction: Improving your overall posture can help reduce stress on the affected tendons. Your physiotherapist may provide guidance on proper ergonomics and body mechanics.
  11. Assistive devices: Using a brace or strap to support the forearm muscles can help reduce strain on the affected tendons during daily activities.
  12. Home exercise program: Your physiotherapist will provide a set of exercises to perform at home to complement your in-clinic physiotherapy sessions. Consistency with these exercises is crucial for your recovery.

It’s important to work closely with your physiotherapist and follow their guidance diligently. They can monitor your progress and adjust your treatment plan as needed.

The specific physiotherapy plan will be tailored to your individual condition and goals, taking into account the severity of your tennis elbow and your overall health.

Recovery from lateral epicondylitis can vary among individuals, but most people experience significant improvement with physiotherapy and conservative management.

However, it’s essential to consult with a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis and to determine the most appropriate course of treatment for your specific condition and symptoms.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Olecranon Bursitis

What is olecranon bursitis?

Olecranon bursitis, often referred to as “student’s elbow” or “Popeye elbow,” is a condition characterized by inflammation and swelling of the olecranon bursa, a small, fluid-filled sac located at the tip of the elbow.

Bursae are present throughout the body and serve as lubricating sacs that reduce friction between tendons, ligaments, and bones, allowing for smooth joint movement.

The olecranon bursa functions to reduce friction between the olecranon, which is the bony tip of the ulna (the larger forearm bone), and the overlying skin and soft tissues. When this bursa becomes inflamed and fills with excess fluid, it results in olecranon bursitis.

What causes olecranon bursitis?

Common causes of olecranon bursitis include:

  1. Direct Trauma: Trauma or a blow to the tip of the elbow can cause inflammation and swelling of the olecranon bursa.
  2. Repetitive Friction: Activities that involve repetitive pressure or friction on the elbow, such as leaning on hard surfaces for extended periods (as seen in students or clerical workers), can lead to chronic irritation and bursitis.
  3. Infection: In some cases, olecranon bursitis can result from an infection, which can occur through breaks in the skin or from a systemic infection spreading to the bursa.

What are the signs and symptoms of olecranon bursitis?

The symptoms of olecranon bursitis may include:

  • Swelling and a noticeable lump or bump at the tip of the elbow.
  • Pain, tenderness, and warmth in the affected area.
  • Limited range of motion in the elbow due to swelling and discomfort.
  • Redness and skin irritation at the elbow, particularly in cases of infected bursitis.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for olecranon bursitis?

Physiotherapy can be a valuable part of the treatment and rehabilitation plan for olecranon bursitis. Physiotherapy aims to reduce pain and inflammation, improve the range of motion in the affected elbow, and address contributing factors that may have caused or exacerbated the condition.

Here’s an outline of the physiotherapy approach for olecranon bursitis:

  1. Initial Assessment: The physiotherapy process typically begins with a comprehensive assessment of your condition to evaluate the extent of the olecranon bursitis and determine any contributing factors.
  2. Manual Therapy: The physiotherapist may use manual techniques to alleviate pain, improve joint mobility, and address soft tissue restrictions in the shoulder and surrounding areas.
  3. Pain Management: In the initial stages, the focus may be on managing pain and reducing inflammation. This can involve modalities like ice or cold therapy, ultrasound, and potentially the use of anti-inflammatory medications as directed by a healthcare provider.
  4. Rest and Protection: Protecting the affected elbow from further irritation is important. Rest and immobilization, such as using a cushion or pad to protect the olecranon, can be helpful.
  5. Range of Motion Exercises: Gentle range of motion exercises will help maintain or improve elbow mobility and prevent stiffness. Your physiotherapist will guide you through passive and active-assistive exercises to avoid overloading the inflamed bursa.
  6. Strengthening Exercises: Once the acute inflammation subsides, strengthening exercises are introduced. These exercises focus on the muscles that support and stabilize the elbow joint. The physiotherapist may use resistance bands, light weights, or isometric exercises to gradually build strength.
  7. Stretching Exercises: Stretching exercises help improve flexibility in the elbow and surrounding muscles. The therapist may include stretches for the triceps and forearm muscles.
  8. Posture and Ergonomics: Education on maintaining proper posture and body mechanics is crucial for preventing recurrence. The physiotherapist may provide guidance on workstation ergonomics and daily life adjustments.
  9. Activity Modification: The physiotherapist will work with you to modify or adapt activities that contribute to the development of olecranon bursitis. For example, teaching proper techniques for avoiding excessive pressure on the elbow.
  10. Home Exercise Program: Your physiotherapist will design a customized home exercise program for you to perform regularly between therapy sessions. Consistency with these exercises is essential for recovery.
  11. Progressive Return to Activities: If the olecranon bursitis is related to specific activities or sports, the physiotherapist will help you create a gradual return-to-activity plan. This involves ensuring you have the necessary strength and mobility to safely resume these activities.

The goal of physiotherapy for olecranon bursitis is to alleviate pain, improve elbow function, and reduce the risk of recurrence. It’s important to work closely with your physiotherapist, adhere to their recommendations, and progress at a pace that’s appropriate for your individual situation.

The specific exercises and treatment plan will be tailored to your needs and the severity of your olecranon bursitis.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

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