Foot & Ankle Conditions

Learn more about the foot and ankle injuries and conditions we treat using physiotherapy:

Achilles Tendonitis

What is Achilles tendonitis?

Achilles tendonitis is a condition characterized by inflammation of the Achilles tendon, which is the large tendon that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone (calcaneus).

The Achilles tendon plays a crucial role in activities that involve ankle movement, such as walking, running, and jumping. Achilles tendonitis is a common overuse injury and can cause pain and discomfort in the back of the ankle and lower calf.

There are two primary types of Achilles tendonitis:

  • Mid-portion Achilles Tendonitis: This type typically affects the middle part of the tendon and is more common in younger, active individuals. It is associated with small tears within the tendon itself.
  • Insertional Achilles Tendonitis: This type occurs at the point where the tendon attaches to the heel bone (calcaneus). It often affects individuals who are less active and may involve calcification of the tendon at the insertion point.

What causes Achilles tendonitis?

Achilles tendonitis typically results from repetitive stress on the Achilles tendon, often due to activities that involve running, jumping, or sudden increases in physical activity. Contributing factors may include tight calf muscles, improper footwear, and biomechanical issues.

What are the signs and symptoms of Achilles tendonitis?

Common symptoms of Achilles tendonitis include:

  • Pain and stiffness in the Achilles tendon, usually near the heel or above it.
  • Tenderness and swelling in the affected area.
  • Pain that worsens with physical activity and may improve with rest.
  • Morning stiffness and discomfort when first stepping out of bed.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for Achilles tendonitis?

Physiotherapy is a valuable component of the treatment and rehabilitation of Achilles tendonitis. The primary goals of physiotherapy for Achilles tendonitis are to reduce pain and inflammation, improve the flexibility and strength of the Achilles tendon and surrounding muscles, and address any biomechanical issues that may contribute to the condition.

Here are common physiotherapy strategies for individuals with Achilles tendonitis:

  1. Pain Management and Inflammation Reduction:
    • Ice application: Physiotherapists may recommend using ice to reduce swelling and alleviate pain in the affected area.
    • Anti-inflammatory techniques: Techniques such as soft tissue massage and manual therapy may be used to reduce muscle tension and inflammation around the Achilles tendon.
  2. Rest and Activity Modification:
    • Rest is essential to allow the inflamed Achilles tendon to heal. Physiotherapists will recommend a temporary reduction in or modification of activities that involve repetitive ankle movement, such as running and jumping.
  3. Stretching Exercises:
    • Stretching exercises target the calf muscles and the Achilles tendon to improve flexibility and reduce tension in the affected area.
  4. Strengthening Exercises:
    • Strengthening exercises focus on the calf muscles, particularly the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. These exercises are crucial to support the Achilles tendon and prevent re-injury.
    • Isometric strengthening exercises are the first stage of the strengthening program.
    • Eccentric strengthening exercises, which involve controlled lengthening of the Achilles tendon, are often a key component of rehabilitation.
  5. Gait Analysis and Correction:
    • Physiotherapists may perform a gait analysis to identify any abnormal walking or running patterns that may contribute to the condition. Recommendations for footwear, orthotic inserts, or changes in running mechanics may be provided.
  6. Proprioceptive and Balance Training:
    • Proprioceptive exercises are designed to improve joint stability and reduce the risk of re-injury. These exercises challenge the Achilles tendon’s ability to maintain balance.
  7. Gradual Return to Activity:
    • Physiotherapists work with individuals to develop a plan for a gradual return to physical activities, incorporating proper warm-up, cool-down, and activity modifications.
  8. Education:
    • Physiotherapists provide education about Achilles tendonitis, its causes, and strategies to prevent recurrence. This includes guidance on proper warm-up and cool-down routines and activity modifications to protect the Achilles tendon.
  9. Home Exercise Programs:
  • A physiotherapist often prescribes exercises and stretches that individuals can perform at home to complement their in-clinic treatments. Consistency with home exercises is crucial for long-term recovery.

It’s important for individuals with Achilles tendonitis to work closely with a qualified physiotherapist and adhere to the recommended treatment plan. Successful rehabilitation often requires time, commitment to exercise programs, and lifestyle modifications.

With proper physiotherapy and consistent home exercises, many individuals can experience pain relief, improved function, and a successful return to their regular activities and sports.

Ankle Fractures

What do I need to know about ankle fractures?

An ankle fracture refers to a break or fracture in one or more of the bones that make up the ankle joint. The ankle is a complex joint that connects the lower leg to the foot, and it consists of three primary bones:

  1. Tibia: The larger bone of the lower leg, which forms the inner part of the ankle joint.
  2. Fibula: The smaller bone of the lower leg, which forms the outer part of the ankle joint.
  3. Talus: A bone in the foot that sits atop the heel bone (calcaneus) and forms the lower part of the ankle joint.

Ankle fractures can occur due to various causes, including traumatic injuries, such as falls, sports-related injuries, and motor vehicle accidents, as well as non-traumatic causes like osteoporosis, which can make bones more prone to fractures.

There are different types of ankle fractures, including:

  1. Lateral Malleolus Fracture: This involves a fracture of the fibula bone, often occurring just above the ankle joint.
  2. Medial Malleolus Fracture: This involves a fracture of the tibia bone on the inner side of the ankle.
  3. Bimalleolar Fracture: In this type of fracture, both the medial and lateral malleoli are fractured.
  4. Trimalleolar Fracture: This is a more complex fracture that involves the tibia, fibula, and the posterior part of the tibia, known as the posterior malleolus.

The severity of an ankle fracture can vary, with some fractures involving displacement of bone fragments and others where the bones remain in alignment.

The treatment approach for ankle fractures depends on factors such as the type and location of the fracture, the extent of displacement, and the individual’s overall health and activity level.

Treatment options for ankle fractures may include:

  1. Immobilization: Non-displaced or stable fractures may be treated with a cast or walking boot to immobilize the ankle and allow the bones to heal.
  2. Closed Reduction: In cases of displaced fractures, the healthcare provider may perform a closed reduction, which involves manipulating the bones back into their proper alignment without surgery. This is often followed by immobilization in a cast or boot.
  3. Surgery: For complex fractures or fractures with significant displacement, surgical intervention may be necessary. Surgery may involve the use of screws, plates, or other fixation devices to stabilize the bones.
  4. Rehabilitation: After the initial treatment, rehabilitation is crucial to regain strength, range of motion, and functional mobility in the ankle. Physiotherapy plays a vital role in the recovery process.

What physiotherapy is available after an ankle fracture?

Physiotherapy plays a vital role in the rehabilitation process following an ankle fracture. The goals of physiotherapy after an ankle fracture are to restore mobility, strength, and function, reduce pain and swelling, and help individuals return to their regular activities.

The specific physiotherapy plan will be tailored to the individual’s injury, surgery (if performed), and overall health. Here are common components of physiotherapy after an ankle fracture:

  1. Pain and Swelling Management:
    • Ice application: Physiotherapists may recommend the use of ice to reduce swelling and alleviate pain in the early stages of recovery.
    • Elevation: Keeping the affected ankle elevated above the level of the heart can help reduce swelling.
  2. Range of Motion Exercises:
    • Gentle, controlled range of motion exercises can be initiated early to prevent joint stiffness. These exercises may include ankle circles, toe pumps, and gentle stretches.
  3. Strengthening Exercises:
    • Strengthening exercises focus on the muscles around the ankle, including the calf muscles, foot muscles, and the muscles that support the ankle joint. These exercises help improve stability and prevent muscle atrophy.
    • Resistance band exercises and calf raises are often part of the strengthening program.
  4. Weight-Bearing Progression:
    • Gradual weight-bearing exercises and walking with the use of crutches or a walker may be incorporated into the rehabilitation program, depending on the type and stability of the fracture.
    • Weight-bearing activities help restore normal walking patterns and build strength.
  5. Balance and Proprioception Training:
    • Balance and proprioception exercises are important for improving joint stability and preventing re-injury. These exercises challenge the ankle’s ability to maintain balance.
  6. Gait Training:
    • Physiotherapists will work with individuals to improve their walking pattern and ensure a normal gait. This may involve adjustments to compensate for any ongoing discomfort.
  7. Functional Activities:
    • As the ankle heals, physiotherapy will include functional activities that mimic daily tasks and recreational activities. This helps individuals regain confidence in their ankle’s abilities.
  8. Education:
    • Physiotherapists provide education on self-care and injury prevention, including instructions on managing pain, protecting the ankle, and exercises to perform at home.
  9. Progressive Rehabilitation:
    • The rehabilitation program is typically progressive, with the intensity and complexity of exercises increasing as the ankle’s strength and stability improve.
  10. Return to Activities:
    • The goal of physiotherapy is to help individuals safely return to their regular activities, including sports or other physical pursuits.

It’s important to note that the specific rehabilitation plan can vary based on the type and severity of the ankle fracture, the presence of any surgical interventions, and the individual’s overall health.

Physiotherapy should be supervised by a qualified physiotherapist who can tailor the program to the individual’s needs and progress. Adhering to the prescribed rehabilitation plan and attending all recommended sessions is essential for a successful recovery and a safe return to normal activities.

Ankle Sprain

What is an ankle sprain?

An ankle sprain is a common musculoskeletal injury that occurs when the ligaments in the ankle are stretched or torn. Ligaments are strong, fibrous bands of tissue that connect bones to each other, providing stability to the joint. Ankle sprains can vary in severity, with three main grades:

  1. Grade 1 (Mild): In a mild ankle sprain, the ligaments are stretched but not torn. This type of sprain typically results in some pain, swelling, and perhaps minor instability. Walking may still be possible.
  2. Grade 2 (Moderate): A moderate ankle sprain involves partial tearing of the ligaments. It is associated with more significant pain, swelling, bruising, and reduced stability. Walking is often difficult or painful.
  3. Grade 3 (Severe): In a severe ankle sprain, the ligaments are completely torn, resulting in significant pain, swelling, bruising, and a high degree of joint instability. Weight-bearing and walking are usually impossible.

What are the different types of ankle sprain?

Ankle sprains are typically caused by the following mechanisms:

  • Inversion: Most ankle sprains occur when the foot is turned inward, resulting in damage to the lateral (outer) ligaments. This is the most common type of ankle sprain.
  • Eversion: Ankle sprains caused by the foot turning outward, damaging the medial (inner) ligaments, are less common.
  • High Ankle Sprain: A high ankle sprain, also known as a syndesmotic sprain, involves damage to the syndesmotic ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula in the lower leg. This type of sprain is less common and typically caused by twisting or hyperextension of the ankle.

What are the signs and symptoms of an ankle sprain?

Common symptoms of an ankle sprain may include:

  • Pain at the site of the injury.
  • Swelling and bruising around the ankle.
  • Difficulty moving the ankle or putting weight on it.
  • Tenderness when touching the affected area.
  • Instability or a feeling of “giving way” when walking or standing.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for ankle sprains?

Physiotherapy plays a crucial role in the rehabilitation and recovery process for an ankle sprain. The primary goals of physiotherapy for an ankle sprain are to reduce pain and inflammation, improve joint stability, restore range of motion, and strengthen the muscles surrounding the ankle.

Here’s a general outline of the physiotherapy approach for an ankle sprain:

  1. Assessment and Diagnosis: A physiotherapist will begin by assessing the severity of the ankle sprain, identifying any associated injuries or complications, and determining the specific treatment plan based on the patient’s needs.
  2. R.I.C.E. Protocol: The initial phase of physiotherapy often involves continued application of the R.I.C.E. protocol (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) to control pain and reduce swelling.
  3. Pain Management: Physiotherapists may use modalities such as ice or heat, electrical stimulation, or ultrasound to manage pain and inflammation in the early stages of rehabilitation.
  4. Immobilization or Support: Depending on the severity of the sprain, the physiotherapist may recommend the use of a brace, splint, or crutches to protect the injured ankle and promote proper healing.
  5. Manual Therapy: Hands-on techniques, such as joint mobilizations and soft tissue massage, may be used to improve joint mobility and reduce muscle tension.
  6. Range of Motion (ROM) Exercises: Gentle range of motion exercises help maintain or restore the flexibility of the ankle joint. These exercises should be performed within the pain-free range.
  7. Strength Training: Strengthening exercises are essential for ankle stability. These exercises target the muscles around the ankle, including the calf muscles, peroneal muscles, and dorsiflexors. Common exercises may include calf raises, ankle circles, and resistance band exercises.
  8. Proprioception and Balance Training: Proprioception exercises help improve joint awareness and balance. These exercises can be crucial in preventing future ankle injuries. Examples include balance board exercises, single-leg stands, and wobble board drills.
  9. Functional Rehabilitation: The physiotherapist will guide the patient through exercises that mimic daily activities and sports-specific movements to ensure a safe return to normal activities and sports.
  10. Gait Training: Patients may receive instruction on walking with proper mechanics to prevent favoring the injured ankle and to reduce the risk of developing an abnormal gait.
  11. Gradual Return to Activity: The physiotherapist will develop a step-by-step plan to gradually reintroduce the patient to their usual activities and sports, taking into account the specific demands of those activities.
  12. Home Exercise Program: The physiotherapist will provide the patient with a personalized home exercise program to continue rehabilitation and maintain progress between sessions.

It’s essential for individuals with ankle sprains to actively participate in their physiotherapy program, as adherence to the exercises and recommendations is key to a successful recovery.

The duration of physiotherapy for an ankle sprain can vary depending on the severity of the injury, but it typically continues until the patient has fully regained strength, flexibility, and stability in the injured ankle.

Consult with a qualified physiotherapist or physical therapist to receive individualized care and guidance throughout your recovery.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments. To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Morton’s Neuroma

What is Morton’s neuroma?

Morton’s neuroma, also known as interdigital neuroma or plantar neuroma, is a painful condition that affects the nerves in the foot, typically between the third and fourth toes or the second and third toes. It involves the thickening of the tissue surrounding one of the nerves leading to the toes. Morton’s neuroma is a benign condition but can cause significant discomfort and pain.

What are the causes of Morton’s neuroma?

The exact cause of Morton’s neuroma is not always clear, but it is often associated with repetitive stress or irritation to the nerve. Factors that may contribute to the development of Morton’s neuroma include:

  • Wearing tight or high-heeled shoes that put pressure on the front of the foot.
  • Abnormal foot structure or biomechanics, such as flat feet or high arches, which can lead to excessive pressure on the nerves.
  • Overuse or activities that involve repetitive pressure on the forefoot, such as running or walking long distances.
  • Trauma or injury to the foot.

What are the signs and symptoms of Morton’s neuroma?

Common symptoms of Morton’s neuroma include:

  • Sharp, shooting, or burning pain in the ball of the foot or between the toes.
  • Numbness or tingling in the toes.
  • A sensation of a pebble or foreign object inside the shoe.
  • Pain that may worsen with activity and improve with rest and removal of tight shoes.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for Morton’s neuroma?

Physiotherapy can be a helpful part of the treatment plan for Morton’s neuroma, a painful condition involving the thickening of tissue around a nerve in the foot.

While physiotherapy cannot directly cure the neuroma, it can focus on alleviating symptoms, improving foot biomechanics, and preventing further irritation.

Here are some common physiotherapy approaches for individuals with Morton’s neuroma:

  1. Foot Biomechanical Assessment: A physiotherapist will assess the individual’s foot biomechanics, including arch height, gait, and foot posture. Identifying any abnormal foot mechanics that contribute to the condition is essential.
  2. Orthotic Inserts: Custom-made or over-the-counter orthotic inserts may be recommended to provide additional arch support, cushioning, and redistribute pressure on the foot, reducing irritation to the neuroma.
  3. Footwear Assessment and Modification: Physiotherapists can provide guidance on selecting appropriate footwear with a wider toe box and lower heels to reduce pressure on the neuroma.
  4. Stretching Exercises: Stretching exercises may be prescribed to improve the flexibility of the toes, metatarsal joints, and plantar fascia. Stretching can help reduce tension in the forefoot and alleviate pain.
  5. Strengthening Exercises: Physiotherapists may recommend exercises to strengthen the intrinsic foot muscles and improve foot stability. Strong foot muscles can help support the arch and distribute pressure more evenly.
  6. Gait Analysis and Correction: Gait analysis can help identify and correct any abnormal walking or running patterns that may contribute to Morton’s neuroma. Recommendations for changes in gait mechanics or footwear may be provided.
  7. Calf Muscle Biomechanics: Addressing calf muscle tightness and imbalances is crucial, as tight calf muscles can increase pressure on the forefoot. Stretching and strengthening exercises for the calf muscles may be included.
  8. Metatarsal Pads and Cushioning: Metatarsal pads or cushioning devices can be used to provide additional support and reduce pressure on the metatarsal heads, where Morton’s neuroma typically occurs.
  9. Activity Modification: Physiotherapists may recommend modifying or temporarily avoiding activities that exacerbate the pain, especially those that involve repetitive forefoot pressure.
  10. Patient Education: Providing education on proper footwear, activity modifications, and self-management techniques is essential. Physiotherapists can offer guidance on how to protect the affected area and manage symptoms effectively.

It’s important to consult with a qualified physiotherapist who can tailor the treatment plan to your specific needs and monitor your progress. While physiotherapy cannot cure Morton’s neuroma, it can play a valuable role in symptom management and improving the overall health and function of the foot.

In cases where conservative treatments are not effective, individuals may need to consider more advanced medical interventions, including corticosteroid injections or surgical removal of the neuroma.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Plantar Fasciitis

What is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition characterized by pain and inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel bone (calcaneus) to the toes.

The plantar fascia plays a crucial role in supporting the arch of the foot and absorbing shock during activities like walking, running, and standing. Plantar fasciitis is often associated with overuse or repetitive strain on the plantar fascia.

What causes plantar fasciitis?

The primary cause of plantar fasciitis is repetitive stress on the plantar fascia. This stress can result from various factors, including:

  • Overuse from activities that put excess strain on the feet, such as running, walking long distances, or standing for extended periods.
  • Wearing footwear with inadequate arch support or poor cushioning.
  • Certain biomechanical factors, such as flat feet (pronation) or high arches (supination), which can affect the distribution of forces on the plantar fascia.
  • Obesity or sudden weight gain, which increases the load on the plantar fascia.

What are the signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis?

Common symptoms of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Sharp, stabbing pain in the heel or the bottom of the foot, especially with the first steps in the morning or after periods of inactivity.
  • Pain that may improve as the foot warms up but worsen with continued activity.
  • Swelling and tenderness in the heel area.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for plantar fasciitis?

Physiotherapy is a valuable component of the treatment and rehabilitation of plantar fasciitis. The primary goals of physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis are to alleviate pain, reduce inflammation, improve flexibility and strength of the foot and lower leg muscles, address biomechanical issues, and promote healing of the plantar fascia.

Here are common physiotherapy strategies for individuals with plantar fasciitis:

  1. Pain Management and Inflammation Reduction:
    • Ice application: Physiotherapists may recommend using ice to reduce swelling and alleviate pain in the affected area.
    • Soft tissue massage and manual therapy techniques can help relieve muscle tension and reduce inflammation in the plantar fascia.
  2. Stretching Exercises:
    • Stretching exercises target the calf muscles, Achilles tendon, and the plantar fascia to improve flexibility and reduce tension in the affected area.
    • Common stretches include the calf stretch, Achilles stretch, and plantar fascia-specific stretches.
  3. Strengthening Exercises:
    • Strengthening exercises focus on the muscles of the foot, lower leg, and intrinsic foot muscles. Strengthening these muscles can provide better support to the arch of the foot and reduce strain on the plantar fascia.
  4. Biomechanical Assessment and Correction:
    • Physiotherapists may perform a biomechanical assessment to identify any abnormal foot or lower limb mechanics that may contribute to plantar fasciitis. Recommendations for footwear, orthotic inserts, or changes in gait mechanics may be provided.
  5. Orthotic Devices: Custom-fitted orthotic devices or prefabricated arch supports may be recommended to provide proper arch support and cushioning to reduce strain on the plantar fascia.
  6. Gait Analysis and Correction:
    • Gait analysis can help identify and correct any abnormal walking or running patterns that may contribute to the condition. Recommendations may include gait retraining or footwear adjustments.
  7. Night Splints: Physiotherapists may recommend night splints to maintain the foot in a dorsiflexed position while sleeping. This can help alleviate morning heel pain.
  8. Gradual Return to Activity: Physiotherapists work with individuals to develop a plan for a gradual return to physical activities, incorporating proper warm-up, cool-down, and activity modifications.
  9. Education:
    • Physiotherapists provide education about plantar fasciitis, its causes, and strategies to prevent recurrence. This may include guidance on proper footwear, activity modifications, and warm-up and cool-down routines.
  10. Home Exercise Programs:
    • A physiotherapist often prescribes exercises and stretches that individuals can perform at home to complement their in-clinic treatments. Consistency with home exercises is crucial for long-term recovery.

It’s important for individuals with plantar fasciitis to work closely with a qualified physiotherapist and adhere to the recommended treatment plan. Successful rehabilitation often requires time, commitment to exercise programs, and lifestyle modifications.

With proper physiotherapy and consistent home exercises, many individuals can experience pain relief, improved function, and a successful return to their regular activities.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Tibialis Posterior Tendinopathy

What is tibialis posterior tendinopathy?

Tibialis posterior tendinopathy, also known as tibialis posterior tendinitis or tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction, is a condition that involves pain, inflammation, and dysfunction of the tibialis posterior tendon.

The tibialis posterior tendon is a key structure that runs along the inner part of the ankle and foot, providing support to the arch of the foot and assisting with various foot movements, such as inversion (turning the sole inward) and plantarflexion (pointing the foot downward).

What are the causes of tibialis posterior tendinopathy?

Tibialis posterior tendinopathy is often caused by overuse or repetitive stress on the tibialis posterior tendon. Common contributing factors include:

  • Activities that involve excessive walking, running, or standing, particularly on hard surfaces.
  • Biomechanical issues, such as flat feet (pronation) or high arches (supination), that can affect the tendon’s function.
  • Age-related degeneration of the tendon.

What are the signs and symptoms of tibialis posterior tendinopathy?

Common symptoms of tibialis posterior tendinopathy include:

  • Pain and tenderness along the inner ankle and the arch of the foot.
  • Swelling and warmth in the affected area.
  • Weakness in the foot and arch.
  • Progressive flattening of the foot’s arch and a tendency for the foot to roll inward (pronation).

What physiotherapy treatment is available for tibialis posterior tendinopathy?

Physiotherapy plays a crucial role in the treatment and rehabilitation of tibialis posterior tendinopathy. The primary goals of physiotherapy for this condition are to alleviate pain, reduce inflammation, improve the strength and flexibility of the tibialis posterior tendon and the surrounding muscles, and address biomechanical issues that may contribute to the problem.

Here are common physiotherapy strategies for individuals with tibialis posterior tendinopathy:

  1. Pain Management and Inflammation Reduction:
    • Ice application: Physiotherapists may recommend using ice to reduce swelling and alleviate pain in the affected area.
    • Soft tissue massage and manual therapy techniques can help relieve muscle tension and reduce inflammation in the tibialis posterior tendon.
  2. Rest and Activity Modification:
    • Rest is essential to allow the injured tendon to heal. Physiotherapists will recommend a temporary reduction in or modification of activities that involve excessive walking, running, or standing.
  3. Stretching Exercises:
    • Stretching exercises target the calf muscles, Achilles tendon, and the tibialis posterior tendon to improve flexibility and reduce tension in the affected area.
  4. Strengthening Exercises:
    • Strengthening exercises focus on the muscles of the lower leg, including the tibialis posterior, as well as the intrinsic foot muscles and those that support the arch. These exercises help improve tendon support and prevent overpronation of the foot.
  5. Biomechanical Assessment and Correction:
    • Physiotherapists may perform a biomechanical assessment to identify any abnormal foot or lower limb mechanics that contribute to tibialis posterior tendinopathy. Recommendations for changes in gait mechanics, footwear, or orthotic inserts may be provided.
  6. Orthotic Devices and Footwear Assessment: Custom-made or over-the-counter orthotic inserts and appropriate footwear may be recommended to provide arch support and cushioning to reduce strain on the tibialis posterior tendon.
  7. Gait Analysis and Correction:
    • Gait analysis can help identify and correct any abnormal walking or running patterns that may contribute to the condition. Recommendations may include gait retraining or footwear adjustments.
  8. Gradual Return to Activity:
    • Physiotherapists work with individuals to develop a plan for a gradual return to physical activities, incorporating proper warm-up, cool-down, and activity modifications.
  9. Education:
    • Physiotherapists provide education about tibialis posterior tendinopathy, its causes, and strategies to prevent recurrence. This may include guidance on proper footwear, activity modifications, and warm-up and cool-down routines.
  10. Home Exercise Programs:
    • A physiotherapist often prescribes exercises and stretches that individuals can perform at home to complement their in-clinic treatments. Consistency with home exercises is crucial for long-term recovery.

It’s important for individuals with tibialis posterior tendinopathy to work closely with a qualified physiotherapist and adhere to the recommended treatment plan. Successful rehabilitation often requires time, commitment to exercise programs, and lifestyle modifications.

With proper physiotherapy and consistent home exercises, many individuals can experience pain relief, improved function, and a successful return to their regular activities.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

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