Neck Conditions

Learn more about the neck injuries and conditions we treat using physiotherapy:

Cervical Disc Herniation

What is a cervical disc herniation?

A cervical disc herniation, also known as a herniated or slipped disc in the neck, occurs when one of the discs that cushion and separate the vertebrae in the cervical spine (neck) protrudes or ruptures. These discs are made up of a tough outer layer (annulus fibrosus) and a gel-like inner core (nucleus pulposus).

When the outer layer becomes damaged or weakens, the inner core can bulge or herniate through the damaged area, pressing on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. This can lead to various symptoms and discomfort in the neck, shoulders, arms, and hands.

What can cause of a cervical disc herniation?

Cervical disc herniation can result from various factors, often involving the aging process and wear and tear on the cervical spine. Common causes and contributing factors include:

  1. Degeneration: The most common cause of cervical disc herniation is degenerative disc disease. As people age, the intervertebral discs in the cervical spine naturally undergo wear and tear. Over time, these discs can become dehydrated, lose their elasticity, and weaken. This degeneration can make the discs more susceptible to herniation.
  2. Trauma or Injury: Sudden and forceful trauma or injury to the neck, such as a car accident, fall, or sports-related injury, can lead to cervical disc herniation. The impact or whiplash effect can damage the discs or force the inner nucleus pulposus through the annulus fibrosus.
  3. Repetitive Stress: Activities or occupations that involve repetitive neck movements or strain can contribute to the development of cervical disc herniation over time. This may include heavy lifting, poor lifting techniques, or jobs that require frequent neck movement or heavy use of the upper body.
  4. Genetics: Some individuals may have a genetic predisposition to disc degeneration and herniation. Genetic factors can affect the structural integrity of the discs and make them more prone to herniation.
  5. Obesity: Excess body weight can put added stress on the cervical spine, leading to increased wear and tear on the discs. This can make them more susceptible to herniation.
  6. Poor Posture: Chronic poor posture, such as slouching or having a forward head position, can increase the load on the cervical discs and contribute to degeneration and herniation over time.
  7. Occupational Factors: Certain occupations that involve prolonged periods of sitting, heavy lifting, or repetitive neck movements may increase the risk of cervical disc herniation.

It’s important to note that while these factors can contribute to the development of cervical disc herniation, the condition can also occur without an obvious cause, especially in cases of age-related degeneration.

Additionally, some individuals may have multiple risk factors that increase their susceptibility to disc herniation.

What are the symptoms of a cervical disc herniation?

Cervical disc herniation can cause a range of symptoms that vary in severity depending on the location and extent of the herniation. Common symptoms of cervical disc herniation include:

  1. Neck Pain: Pain in the neck is a common symptom of cervical disc herniation. The pain may be localized or radiate to other areas, such as the shoulders, arms, or upper back. Pain may worsen or be triggered by specific movements or positions, such as bending the neck forward or backward, rotating the head, or straining.
  2. Radiating Arm Pain: One of the hallmark symptoms of cervical disc herniation is pain that radiates from the neck into one or both arms. The pain often follows a specific nerve pathway and can be sharp, burning, or shooting in nature.
  3. Tingling and Numbness: Many individuals with cervical disc herniation experience tingling sensations (paresthesia) or numbness in the arms, hands, fingers, or other areas along the affected nerve pathway.
  4. Headaches: Some individuals with cervical disc herniation may experience headaches, especially if the condition is associated with muscle tension or nerve irritation in the neck.
  5. Muscle Weakness: Weakness in the muscles of the arms or hands may occur, particularly if the herniated disc is compressing or irritating the nerves that control muscle function.
  6. Loss of Coordination: In more severe cases or if the spinal cord is affected, individuals may experience a loss of coordination, which can manifest as difficulty with fine motor skills, clumsiness, or difficulty with tasks like buttoning a shirt.
  7. Stiff Neck: A stiff neck is a common symptom and can be accompanied by reduced range of motion in the neck.
  8. Changes in Reflexes: In cases where the spinal cord is affected, reflexes in the arms may be altered.
  9. Bowel or Bladder Changes (Rare): In very rare and severe cases, cervical disc herniation can cause compression of the spinal cord, leading to changes in bowel or bladder function. This is a medical emergency.

It’s important to note that not everyone with a cervical disc herniation will experience all these symptoms, and the severity and duration of symptoms can vary. Additionally, some individuals may have asymptomatic disc herniations, meaning they do not experience any noticeable symptoms.

What physiotherapy treatments can help cervical disc herniation?

Physiotherapy plays a crucial role in the management and rehabilitation of cervical disc herniation. The primary goals of physiotherapy for cervical disc herniation are to reduce pain, improve neck mobility, strengthen the neck and shoulder muscles, and enhance overall function.

Here are common physiotherapy treatments and exercises for cervical disc herniation:

  1. Assessment: A physiotherapist will begin by conducting a thorough assessment to determine the extent of the herniation, the severity of symptoms, and any underlying issues.
  2. Pain Management: Managing pain is often the first step. Physiotherapists may use modalities such as heat or cold therapy, acupuncture, or manual techniques to reduce pain and inflammation.
  3. Manual Therapy: Hands-on techniques are used to address muscle tightness, joint stiffness, and soft tissue restrictions in the neck and upper back. Techniques may include joint mobilization, massage, myofascial release, and gentle manipulation.
  4. Range of Motion Exercises: Gentle exercises are prescribed to improve neck mobility and flexibility. These exercises help reduce stiffness and prevent the development of a stiff neck.
  5. Strengthening Exercises: Gradual strengthening exercises target the muscles of the neck, shoulders, and upper back. Strengthening these muscles can help stabilize the neck and improve posture, reducing strain on the affected area.
  6. Postural Education: Poor posture is often a contributing factor to neck pain and cervical disc herniation. Physiotherapists can provide guidance on maintaining proper posture, both during daily activities and while sitting or standing for extended periods.
  7. Ergonomic Assessment: For individuals whose neck pain is related to work or daily activities, physiotherapists may conduct ergonomic assessments to identify and modify factors contributing to the pain. This may include adjusting workstations, chair height, or computer monitor placement.
  8. Neuromuscular Re-education: These exercises and activities help retrain the muscles to function correctly, improving coordination and control.
  9. Stretching Exercises: Specific stretching exercises can help alleviate muscle tension and improve flexibility in the neck and surrounding areas.
  10. Education: Patients are educated about cervical disc herniation, potential triggers for pain, and strategies to prevent or manage symptoms. This includes teaching proper lifting techniques and providing guidance on self-management strategies.
  11. Home Exercise Program: A personalized home exercise program is typically prescribed to help patients continue their rehabilitation independently between physiotherapy sessions.
  12. Progress Monitoring: Regular assessments are conducted to track progress and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

The specific treatment plan for cervical disc herniation will depend on the individual’s condition, the extent of the herniation, and the severity of symptoms. Early intervention and proper management can help alleviate symptoms, improve neck function, and enhance the patient’s overall quality of life. 

 If you are experiencing symptoms of cervical disc herniation, such as neck pain, radiating arm pain, tingling, or weakness, it’s important to seek medical evaluation and treatment.

Early diagnosis and appropriate management can help alleviate symptoms and prevent further complications.  If you would like to book an appointment with one of our FCAMT physiotherapists, click here.

Cervical Spinal Stenosis

What is cervical spinal stenosis?

Cervical stenosis, also known as cervical spinal stenosis, is a medical condition characterized by the narrowing of the spinal canal in the cervical (neck) region of the spine. The spinal canal houses the spinal cord and nerve roots, and when it becomes constricted or narrowed, it can lead to pressure on the spinal cord and nerves, potentially causing a range of symptoms and neurological problems.

What causes cervical spinal stenosis?

Cervical stenosis can result from a variety of factors, including:

  1. Aging: The natural degeneration of the spine over time, which may involve the development of bone spurs, herniated discs, and thickened ligaments, can contribute to cervical stenosis.
  2. Degenerative Disc Disease: The breakdown of the spinal discs in the cervical region can lead to a loss of disc height, potentially reducing the space available for the spinal cord.
  3. Herniated Discs: Disc herniation, where the inner portion of the disc pushes through the outer layer, can narrow the spinal canal and put pressure on the spinal cord or nerves.
  4. Bone Spurs (Osteophytes): The development of bone spurs on the vertebral bones can encroach on the spinal canal, causing compression.
  5. Congenital Factors: Some people are born with a narrower spinal canal in the cervical region, which can make them more susceptible to cervical stenosis.

What are the signs and symptoms of cervical spinal stenosis?

Common symptoms of cervical stenosis may include:

  • Neck pain or stiffness.
  • Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the arms, hands, legs, or feet.
  • Difficulty with coordination or balance.
  • Difficulty walking, particularly in more severe cases.
  • Changes in bowel or bladder function (in severe cases).

The severity of symptoms can vary widely, with some individuals experiencing mild discomfort, while others may have significant neurological deficits.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for cervical spinal stenosis?

Physiotherapy can play a supportive role in the management of cervical spinal stenosis, particularly in cases where conservative (non-surgical) treatment is recommended. The primary goal of physiotherapy for cervical spinal stenosis is to alleviate pain, improve neck and upper extremity function, and help patients maintain or regain mobility and strength. Here is an overview of the physiotherapy approach for cervical spinal stenosis:

Pain Management:

  • Modalities: The physiotherapist may use modalities such as heat, ice or acupuncture/GunnIMS to manage pain and reduce inflammation.
  • Posture and Ergonomics: Education on maintaining good posture and proper ergonomics in daily activities to reduce strain on the cervical spine.

Range of Motion and Mobility Exercises:

  • Gentle Neck Exercises: Passive and active-assisted range of motion exercises for the neck are introduced to improve cervical spine mobility.

Strengthening Exercises:

  • Neck and Upper Extremity Strength: Specific exercises to strengthen the neck and upper extremity muscles may be prescribed. These exercises can help support the cervical spine and maintain functional strength.

Stretching and Flexibility:

  • Neck and Upper Extremity Stretching: Stretching exercises are used to enhance flexibility in the neck, shoulders, and upper extremities.

Postural Training:

  • Neck and Spine Stabilization: Exercises to enhance cervical and spinal stabilization and posture can help prevent further deterioration and alleviate discomfort.

Balance and Coordination:

  • Balance and Coordination Exercises: These exercises aim to improve balance and coordination, which may be affected in cases of cervical spinal stenosis.

Pain Relief Techniques:

  • Manual Therapy: Techniques such as soft tissue mobilization, joint mobilization, and manual stretching may be used to reduce pain and improve mobility.
  • Cervical Traction: In some cases, cervical traction may be employed to relieve pressure on the cervical spine and spinal cord.

Education:

  • Education on Body Mechanics: Instruction on proper body mechanics to avoid excessive strain on the neck and cervical spine.
  • Activity Modification: Guidance on modifying daily activities and sports to prevent exacerbation of symptoms.

Home Exercise Program:

  • Customized Home Exercise Program: The physiotherapist provides a personalized exercise program for the patient to perform regularly between therapy sessions. Consistency with these exercises is crucial for recovery.

The specific physiotherapy plan for cervical spinal stenosis will be tailored to the patient’s needs, symptoms, and the severity of the condition. Regular communication and collaboration with the physiotherapist are essential to monitor progress and make necessary adjustments to the treatment plan.

Physiotherapy can be a valuable component of the comprehensive approach to managing cervical spinal stenosis, helping patients maintain function and improve their quality of life.

Degenerative Disc Disease

What is degenerative disc disease?

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is a medical condition that affects the intervertebral discs of the spine. Despite its name, DDD is not always a “disease” in the traditional sense; it’s more accurately described as a natural and age-related degeneration of the spinal discs.

These discs are the soft, cushion-like structures located between the vertebrae, which make up the spinal column. The primary role of these discs is to act as shock absorbers, providing flexibility, stability, and allowing the spine to move.

What causes DDD?

DDD typically results from the natural aging process and wear and tear on the spine. As people age, the intervertebral discs tend to lose their water content, making them less flexible and more prone to damage. Repetitive motion, injuries, and genetic factors can also contribute to DDD.

What are the signs and symptoms of DDD?

DDD can cause a range of symptoms, which may vary depending on the location and extent of disc degeneration. Common symptoms include chronic low back pain, occasional flare-ups of severe pain, and radiating pain or numbness into the buttocks, thighs, or legs. These symptoms may be exacerbated by movements such as bending, lifting, or twisting.

What physiotherapy treatment is available for DDD?

Physiotherapy can be an integral part of the management and treatment plan for Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD). The goals of physiotherapy in DDD are to alleviate pain, improve mobility, strengthen the supporting muscles, and enhance overall quality of life.

Here are some common physiotherapy approaches for individuals with DDD:

  1. Manual Therapy: Hands-on techniques, such as soft tissue massage, joint mobilization, and myofascial release, can be used to reduce muscle tension, improve circulation, and enhance mobility in the affected area.
  2. Pain Management: Physiotherapists may use various pain management techniques to help reduce discomfort associated with DDD. This can include heat or cold therapy, acupuncture or GunnIMS, and manual therapy techniques to ease muscle tension and inflammation in the affected area.
  3. Exercise Programs: A personalized exercise program is designed to address specific needs and limitations of the individual. Components of this program may include:
    • Core-strengthening exercises to stabilize the spine and alleviate pressure on the discs.
    • Flexibility and range of motion exercises to maintain spinal mobility.
    • Posture correction and ergonomic training to minimize strain on the spine.
    • Specific exercises to improve body mechanics and enhance overall functional capacity.
  4. Traction: Spinal traction, either manual or mechanical, may be employed to gently decompress the spine and reduce pressure on the affected discs.
  5. Education: Physiotherapists can provide education about DDD, its management, and lifestyle modifications to protect the spine. This includes guidance on proper lifting techniques, ergonomics, and strategies to prevent future issues.
  6. Ergonomics and Activity Modification: Physiotherapists can offer recommendations on how to modify work and daily activities to reduce strain on the spine and prevent the exacerbation of symptoms.
  7. Home Exercise Programs: A physiotherapist often prescribes exercises and stretches that individuals can perform at home to complement their in-clinic treatments.
  8. Gradual Progression: The physiotherapy program typically focuses on gradual progression to prevent overexertion or exacerbation of symptoms. The program is adjusted based on an individual’s response to treatment and progress.

It’s essential for individuals with DDD to work closely with a qualified physiotherapist to develop a comprehensive plan for managing their condition. The specific exercises and interventions will depend on the severity of DDD, the location of affected discs, and individual factors.

Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new exercise program to ensure it’s safe and appropriate for your specific situation.

With proper physiotherapy and adherence to a comprehensive treatment plan, many individuals with DDD can experience improved pain management, enhanced function, and a better quality of life.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments. To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Neck Pain

What is neck pain?

Physiotherapy can be an important component of the management and treatment of degenerative joint disease in the neck, which is often referred to as cervical spondylosis or cervical osteoarthritis. This condition involves the wear and tear of the vertebrae and discs in the neck, leading to pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility. 

What causes neck pain?

  1. Muscle strain: Poor posture, sleeping in an uncomfortable position, or sudden movements can strain the neck muscles. Applying ice or heat packs, taking over-the-counter pain relievers, and gently stretching the neck muscles can provide some relief. Resting and avoiding activities that worsen the pain is also helpful.
  2. Poor ergonomics: Sitting or working in an awkward position for extended periods can strain the neck. Ensure your workspace is properly set up with an ergonomic chair, desk, and computer screen at eye level. Take regular breaks to stretch and change positions.
  3. Neck injury: If you’ve recently experienced trauma or injury to your neck, it’s essential to seek medical attention immediately. Neck injuries can be severe and require professional evaluation.
  4. Stress and tension: Emotional stress can cause muscle tension in the neck and shoulders. Relaxation techniques such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, or gentle neck stretches can help relieve tension.
  5. Text neck: Constantly looking down at screens, such as smartphones or tablets, can strain the neck. Try to bring devices closer to eye level and take frequent breaks from prolonged screen time.

If your neck pain persists, worsens, or is accompanied by other symptoms like numbness, tingling, or weakness, it’s crucial to consult a physiotherapist for a proper evaluation and guidance. They will be able to provide a more accurate diagnosis and recommend appropriate treatment options based on your specific condition.

What can physiotherapy do to help neck pain?

Physiotherapy aims to alleviate pain, improve neck function, and enhance the patient’s overall quality of life. Here are some common physiotherapy treatments for degenerative joint disease in the neck:

  1. Assessment: A physiotherapist will start with a comprehensive assessment to understand the extent of degeneration, the patient’s range of motion, muscle strength, and any specific symptoms or limitations.
  2. Pain Management: Managing pain is often the first priority. Physiotherapists may use various modalities such as heat or cold therapy, ultrasound, electrical stimulation (TENS), or laser therapy to reduce pain and inflammation.
  3. Manual Therapy: Hands-on techniques are used to address joint stiffness, muscle tension, and soft tissue restrictions in the neck. These techniques may include joint mobilization, massage, myofascial release, and gentle manipulation.
  4. Range of Motion Exercises: Gentle exercises are prescribed to improve neck mobility and flexibility. These exercises help reduce stiffness and prevent the development of a stiff neck.
  5. Strengthening Exercises: Gradual strengthening exercises target the muscles of the neck, shoulders, and upper back. Strengthening these muscles can help stabilize the neck and improve posture, reducing strain on the affected area.
  6. Postural Education: Poor posture is often a contributing factor to neck pain and degeneration. Physiotherapists can provide guidance on maintaining proper posture, both during daily activities and while sitting or standing for extended periods.
  7. Ergonomic Assessment: For individuals whose neck pain is related to work or daily activities, physiotherapists may conduct ergonomic assessments to identify and modify factors contributing to the pain. This may include adjusting workstations, chair height, or computer monitor placement.
  8. Neuromuscular Re-education: These exercises and activities help retrain the muscles to function correctly, improving coordination and control.
  9. Stretching Exercises: Specific stretching exercises can help alleviate muscle tension and improve flexibility in the neck and surrounding areas.
  10. Modalities: In addition to pain management techniques mentioned earlier, physiotherapists may use other modalities such as acupuncture or heat to help manage pain and improve muscle function.
  11. Education: Patients are educated about cervical spondylosis, potential triggers for pain, and strategies to prevent or manage symptoms. This includes teaching proper lifting techniques and providing guidance on self-management strategies.
  12. Home Exercise Program: A personalized home exercise program is typically prescribed to help patients continue their rehabilitation independently between physiotherapy sessions.
  13. Progress Monitoring: Regular assessments are conducted to track progress and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

The specific treatment plan for degenerative joint disease in the neck will depend on the individual’s condition, the extent of degeneration, and the severity of symptoms. Physiotherapy can be a valuable part of managing this condition, improving neck function, and enhancing the patient’s overall quality of life.

Always consult with a healthcare professional, such as a physiotherapist, for a thorough evaluation and personalized treatment plan if you are experiencing neck pain due to cervical spondylosis.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Cervicogenic Headache

What is a Cervicogenic Headache?

A cervicogenic headache refers to a type of headache that originates from the cervical spine or neck region. It is characterized by pain that typically starts in the neck and radiates to the head, often affecting one side of the head, the face, and occasionally the shoulders or arms.

The term “cervicogenic” signifies that the headache is caused by dysfunction or problems in the cervical spine or its surrounding structures.

What causes Cervicogenic Headache?

Cervicogenic headaches are believed to result from various sources, including muscular tension, joint dysfunction, nerve compression, or injury to the structures in the neck.

Some common causes include poor posture, cervical spine arthritis, whiplash injuries, herniated discs, or trauma to the neck. These headaches may be triggered or worsened by certain neck movements, sustained postures, or activities that put strain on the cervical spine.

What are the signs and symptoms of Cervicogenic Headache?

The pain associated with cervicogenic headaches is often described as a dull, aching sensation, which can be persistent and difficult to relieve. The pain may be accompanied by neck stiffness, limited range of motion, joint restrictions, shoulder pain, and tenderness in the neck and shoulder regions.

Cervicogenic headaches can also lead to associated symptoms such as dizziness, visual disturbances, and nausea.

Physiotherapy for Cervicogenic Headache

It is important for individuals experiencing headaches to consult with a skilled Physiotherapist for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.  This will result in a tailored treatment plan based on the underlying causes and individual circumstances.  Your physiotherapy treatment may include:

  1. Manual therapy techniques: to mobilize or stretch joint restrictions in your neck, upper back and shoulders.
  2. GunnIMS: an acupuncture technique used to release muscle shortening, which presses on and irritates the nerve.  IMS, in effect, treats the underlying neuropathic condition that causes the pain. Supersensitive areas can be desensitized, and the persistent pull of shortened muscles can be released.
  3. Acupuncture: to stimulate the nervous system, to decrease muscle tightness, increase blood flow and reduce pain.
  4. Soft Tissue Release: trigger point release and stretching of the soft tissues in the neck and shoulder area.
  5. Strengthening exercises: directed to the deep neck flexors and extensor as well as imbalances around the shoulder girdle that may be contributing to your headache.
  6. Posture and Ergonomic Education: to prevent the further development of muscle imbalance related to sustained positions.

If you are suffering from headaches and would like to book an appointment with one of our experienced FCAMT physiotherapists, click here!

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

Whiplash

What is Whiplash?

Whiplash is a term used to describe a specific type of neck injury that occurs when the head is suddenly jolted backward and then forward, or vice versa, in a rapid and forceful manner. It commonly happens in car accidents, particularly rear-end collisions, but can also occur during sports activities or other traumatic events.

The sudden motion of the head causes the neck to move beyond its normal range of motion, resulting in strain and damage to the ligaments, muscles, and other soft tissues in the neck.

Symptoms of whiplash may include neck pain, stiffness, headache, dizziness, shoulder pain, and sometimes even cognitive or psychological symptoms such as memory problems or irritability.

What can Physiotherapy do to help whiplash?

 Physiotherapy plays a significant role in the rehabilitation of individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). The goals of physiotherapy for whiplash are to reduce pain, improve neck mobility and strength, and restore normal function. Here are common physiotherapy treatments for whiplash:

  1. Assessment: A physiotherapist will start by conducting a thorough assessment to determine the extent of your injury, the specific symptoms you are experiencing, and any underlying issues.
  2. Pain Management: Managing pain is often the first step in treatment. Techniques such as ice or heat therapy, acupuncture, or massage may be used to reduce pain and inflammation.
  3. Manual Therapy: Physiotherapists may use hands-on techniques to address muscle tightness, joint stiffness, and soft tissue restrictions in the neck and upper back. This can include joint mobilization, massage, and myofascial release.
  4. Range of Motion Exercises: Gentle exercises designed to improve neck mobility and flexibility may be prescribed. These exercises help prevent the development of a stiff neck and improve the ability to perform daily activities.
  5. Strengthening Exercises: Gradual strengthening exercises target the muscles of the neck, shoulders, and upper back. These exercises help stabilize the neck and improve posture, reducing strain on the injured tissues.
  6. Postural Education: Proper posture is crucial for preventing further strain on the neck and upper back. Physiotherapists can provide guidance on maintaining good posture, both during daily activities and while sitting or standing for extended periods.
  7. Neuromuscular Re-education: This involves exercises and activities that help retrain the muscles to function correctly, improving coordination and control.
  8. Education: Patients are educated about their condition, potential triggers for symptoms, and strategies to prevent recurrence. This includes teaching proper lifting techniques and ergonomic principles.
  9. Home Exercise Program: A personalized home exercise program is typically prescribed to help patients continue their rehabilitation independently between physiotherapy sessions.
  10. Gradual Return to Activities: Physiotherapists work with patients to gradually reintroduce activities that may have been limited due to the whiplash injury, such as work-related tasks or sports, while ensuring that the neck is adequately supported and protected during the recovery process.
  11. Progress Monitoring: Regular assessments are conducted to track progress and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

It’s important to start physiotherapy for whiplash as early as possible to prevent the development of chronic symptoms and promote a quicker recovery. The specific treatment plan will vary depending on the severity of the injury and individual patient needs.

Always consult with a healthcare professional, such as a physiotherapist, for a thorough evaluation and personalized treatment plan if you have whiplash-related symptoms.  If you would like to book with one of our FCAMT physiotherapists, click here.

It’s important to undergo a comprehensive evaluation by a physiotherapist, to determine the cause of your vertigo and create an appropriate treatment plan. VRT is most effective when tailored to your specific type of vertigo, and consistency with prescribed exercises is essential for achieving positive outcomes.

With proper guidance and commitment, many individuals with vertigo can experience significant relief and improved balance through physiotherapy treatments.   To book your assessment with one of our FCAMT Physiotherapists, click here.

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